Hot Reads 12/7/14

It’s holiday time but I haven’t read much on the subject so far except “Journey Into Light” which is linked to below. It was a fun read, all about the traditions of mid-winter, Christmas and Advent, and the Goddess culture. You won’t want to miss it.

Other offerings today include issues of women in film, women in gaming, women as writers, women (and men) in rock n roll, and all sorts of other interesting reads. So peruse my list while you’re having your coffee or tea and let me know what you think. Enjoy!

Photo via Variety

Photo via Variety

From Variety: Oscars Best Actress Race: Where’s the competition?
Favorite quote: “This is a result of the way Hollywood now does business. Women are an endangered species across all genres of the film industry, in both big movies and small. On the blockbuster side, studios continue to obsess over mega-budget franchises, where women are treated as an after-thought (see Glenn Close in “Guardians of the Galaxy,” or Keri Russell in “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes”). No matter how many hits there are on the scale of “The Hunger Games,” “Maleficent” or “The Fault in Our Stars,” male executives still cling to the outdated belief that male audiences won’t pay to see a girl headline a movie, because they can’t relate to female protagonists.”
Note: Of course, Wild is mentioned in this piece and it’s a book that I was completely immersed in when it first came out in 2012. I read it during a difficult time in my life and it resonated so soundly with me as it has with others. I hope the movie does it justice.

From Film Maker Magazine: David Lynch and Patti Smith Talk Blue Velvet, Twin Peaks and More on the BBC

Photo via Film Maker Magazine

Photo via Film Maker Magazine

Favorite quote: All of it. Every.Single.Word.
Note: This is actually a video but it’s the thing I enjoyed most in my reading and online surfing in the past couple of weeks. How inspired was this to have these two icons interview each other? Patti Smith is in my opinion one of the most creative, free-speaking women of any generation and David Lynch is a visionary film maker. Watching this was heaven.

From NPR: Your Adult Siblings May Be the Secret to a Long, Happy Life
Favorite quote: “The benefits can carry into old age. The literature on sibling relationships shows that during middle age and old age, indicators of well-being — mood, health, morale, stress, depression, loneliness, life satisfaction — are tied to how you feel about your brothers and sisters.”

From The Guardian: The gaming journalist who tells on her internet trolls – to their mothers
Favorite quote: “It was just a way to try to reach a resolution, to productively teach young boys it’s not okay to be sexist to women, even if they’re on the internet,” she says, “that they are real people and that there should be actual consequences for that.”
Note: Good for her! Moms will kick those boys asses.

amy

Photo via The New York Times

From The New York Times: Greil Marcus’s History of Rock n Roll in Ten Songs
Favorite quote: “Every great, enduring rock song is like a cell in our cultural memory. A molecule of our shared experience containing not just an incredible performance but also a shared desire for something — love, money, sex, peace, rebellion, power, freedom — some intensely held desire.”

Note: Agreed!

and also
What You Learn in Your Forties
Favorite quote: “In Paris, it’s when waiters start calling you “Madame” without an ironic wink. The conventional wisdom is that you’re still reasonably young, but that everything is declining: health, fertility, the certainty that you will one day read “Hamlet” and know how to cook leeks.”

From Flavorwire: 35 Susan Sontag Quotes on Art, Writing, and Life
Favorite quote: “To me, literature is a calling, even a kind of salvation. It connects me with an enterprise that is over 2,000 years old. What do we have from the past? Art and thought. That’s what lasts. That’s what continues to feed people and give them an idea of something better. A better state of one’s feelings or simply the idea of a silence in one’s self that allows one to think or to feel. Which to me is the same.”

From Feminism and Religion: Journey into Light
Favorite quote: “I experienced these traditions first hand when I lived in Germany. In the Bavarian town of Kirchseeon, just east of Munich, mummers in hand-carved wooden masks perform the “Perchtenlauf,” a wild torchlit procession through the winter forest to awaken the dormant nature spirits and call back the dwindling sun. These processions centre around a female figure called Perchta or Holda, possibly an ancestral memory of an ancient Goddess of light and darkness.”

Because it’s holiday time and because this photo grabbed my attention and made me want to lick the screen, I’m adding a recipe this week. No, I haven’t made this but I want to. Doesn’t it look scrumptious?

Photo via Homemade Delish

Photo via Homemade Delish

Via Homemade Delish:   Pumpkin Cheesecake with Pecan Glaze

 

The Featured Book List is from Samuel Snoek-Brown, the author of Hagridden which I loved and reviewed here. I think this book list is really great because it’s an “alternative” list, by which I mean an alternative to the best sellers lists that we see everywhere. (Although I think many should be on the best sellers list!) I’ve read a few of the books he mentions and they will be in a post I’m planning about my 2014 book reading year. Trust me, this is a great list.

Featured poem is “White Birches” by Jennifer Martelli in video format narrated by Dave Bonta.  I love video poems and this one was especially enjoyable. I hope you like it too.

 

Have a great reading week and don’t forget to follow us on Pinterest!

This Autumn Refresh Your Wild Spirit

It’s finally autumn in New Orleans, I think, since we’ve had a couple of cool-ish days and it’s mid-October. The sky today is a blue so blue it’s like looking into infinity and the air is thin and breathable. Ahhhhh…. On days like this all I want to do is sit lie in the backyard and stare up through the trees and daydream. But the crisp, cool days are also great for revving your spirit up, for tackling projects that were too hot to handle in the summer, and (best of all) for spending some time paying attention to YOU and to what nourishes you.

I read an article on Rebelle Society, a cool website I recently discovered, that I just had to share with you. They’ve graciously given me permission to share their list of 8 Wondrous Ways to Restore Your Wild Spirit, part of a longer piece by Victoria Erickson. Sometimes we need to be reminded that the simple things are still the  best things for restoring a weary spirit. The entire article is here and I highly recommend it!

1. Garden

Gardeners are cultivators and regenerators, harvesting new life and replacing the old, stagnant energy with new seeds. Dig into the dirt with bare hands and breathe the essence of herbs and flowers into your wise body, for it will recognize them as home. Get earthy and gorgeously dirty.

***

2. Feed on raw food.

Energize, alkalize, and heal your body on a deep, cellular level. Nourish yourself with vibrant greens and fresh juices with nutrients you know the story behind; nutrients that heal illnesses instead of creating them with chemicals born in a lab.

“The food you eat can be either the safest and most powerful form of medicine or the slowest form of poison. ” ~ Ann Wigmore

Start buzzing with aliveness from food that is also alive, and feel your body’s wisdom beat with every breath.

***

 3. Find live music.

Find the kind of music that makes your soul soar from the sound. From drum circles under ancient trees, to jazz on city streets, to underground clubs that keep people dancing through the night, music’s rhythmic beats exist to tell universal truths that awaken us from everyday hibernation. 

Have you ever seen crowds of 60,000 people at music festivals?  They sing with the bands under enormous summer skies, erupting into applause, dance, and smiles so large they ache. If that isn’t the wild, primal roar of the human spirit, than I don’t know what is. Find it, because music, my friends, is life. 

***

4. Play. 

Find the most hilarious person you know, whether it’s over social media, lunch, or the work water cooler and laugh. Even if you only have 20 minutes, take a random car ride to somewhere even more random. Dance to eighties music while you clean the house, paint the inside of your garage neon, or watch a Pixar movie with your favorite kiddo.

Personally, I love swing sets. I don’t care what your age is or how busy you are, play is essential to promote a youthful mind which is dynamic, curious, and enthusiastic, and that will open you to new possibilities which will feed your wild spirit even more.  A playful mind is fluid, creative, and of course, wild.

***

 5. Make love.

“Despite what you’ve been conditioned to believe, sexual desire is sacred and virtuous. When you and your beloved merge physically and emotionally, you go beyond the boundaries of the ego and experience timelessness, naturalness, playfulness and defenselessness.” ~ Deepak Chopra

Make love like it’s your last night on earth, gasping for air and sanity, frantic under clouds and stars and sheets. The kind of animalistic lovemaking that’s written in books that hypnotizes and captivates. The kind that’s made of heartbeats, intertwined flesh, and fiery, blazing, all consuming passion.

***

6. Get wet.

These are cures that open you in places you forgot could even open, for salt and water are a miraculous mix. Release disappointment through tears, sweat from awesome, bodily pumping movement, and swim in the soft caress of water.

These wild activities often launch you into the feeling of vulnerability and renewed power at the same time, while carrying you to a a clearer place inside your mind. Yes, there you are again, wild one.

 ***

7. Tell your stories. 

Tell stories of your childhood, of deep rooted pain, of intense loss, of blood and of your greatest loves. Tell them by firelight under violet, star-filled skies, or by sending words into cyberspace. Tell them over cups of strong espresso or glasses of sweet red wine. Tell them with tears and laughter and faith in the human race. Tell them to friends, to lovers, and to strangers.

Everyone has stories that need to be told, and there is always someone to listen. Make sure you tell your stories while you still have the chance.

***

8. Shine.

Show who you are, authentically, and completely unapologetically. Be fearless in your ambitions, goals and decisions. That energy will then spread itself into the universe and boost the human race, for one drop can indeed, raise the entire ocean.

“As we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people the right to do the same. As we are liberated from our fear, our presence automatically liberates others” ~ Marianne Williamson

And as you work on these wondrous things to restore your wild spirit, do remember that even when you’re still not quite there, you are a miraculous human warrior and that…

***All images via Rebelle Society

Hot Reads 10/5/14

Today’s Hot Reads is being brought to you without commentary because I haven’t had time this week to build the post as I usually do. My cat, Fluff, died Thursday after 3 weeks of a strange, debilitating neurological illness that caused paralysis of his back legs. We spent a lot of time at the vet office and a lot of time caring for him. He was the sweetest, most affectionate cat I ever had and he was only two years old. It’s very sad.

Anyway, I did do some late night reading the past week that I want to pass along. Here’s the list:

From NPR: First Listen: Lucinda Williams, Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone

From Rebecca F.: Why You Should Care That Lady Gaga’s Sueing Me For 1.4 Million

From Women’s Voices For Change: Jasmine Tridevil’s Tale

From Gambit: I’m a Seventh Generation New Orleanian

banksyFrom The Independent: Offensive Banksy immigration mural in Clacton scrubbed off wall by council

From The Atlantic: Confronting My Cyberbully 13 Years Later

From The Toast: “A Witch!”: On Women’s Intuition and Men Behaving Badly

And for a funny tongue-in-check (not really. yes, really. well, maybe) from Buzzfeed: 25 Things That Happen When You Talk About Feminism on the Internet

glinda

No book list this week and the poem of the week is actually five by the wonderful poet Luisa Igloria via The Poetry Storehouse. The link includes audio of the poems as well as text. A favorite snippet:

And in the dream

I am always though no longer
a girl before the world
had its way with me,

always the one listening
for the sounds of hidden things.

______________________________

Beginning with today’s post, Hot Reads will be published every other Sunday instead of every Sunday. Have a great reading week, y’all!

 

Hot Reads 9/21/14

Last week’s reading was all over the spectrum. I just finished watching the first season of Orange Is the New Black on Netflix and totally get all the hoopla I’d been hearing about the show. It’s funny and heartbreaking and I’m starting season 2 as soon as I finish this post. The first link is by a writer of the show – I think you’ll like it. Also in the mix are stories about a local music legend, healthcare issues and, of course, books.
Happy Reading!

Photo via Identities.Mic

Photo via Identities.Mic

From Identities.Mic: “While Writing for ‘Orange Is the New Black,’ I Realized I Am Gay
Favorite quote: “I was finally forced to consider a question that had never, ever occurred to me before: Holy shit, am I gay?”

Photo via VPR.net

Photo via VPR.net

From The Cosimo Code: A Tribute to Cosimo Matassa
Tagline: A Fond Farewell to the true Architect of Rock & Roll and The Godfather of New Orleans R&B
Favorite quote: “For all his appealing modesty, Cosimo Matassa was able to take pride in his twilight years in seeing tangible recognition in the form of the Grammy Lifetime Achievement in Music Business Award in 2007, historic landmark status for J&M studios by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2010, and induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2012.”

From Unclutterer.: When Multitasking Can Be Dangerous
Favorite quote: “Someone talking on a cell phone, hands-free or not, is about four times more likely to be involved in an accident than someone who isn’t using a cell phone.”
Note: I know I’ve had some close calls from drivers on cell phones. Just. Don’t.

From The Daily Sheeple: Lead Developer Of HPV Vaccines Comes Clean, Warns Parents & Young Girls It’s All A Giant Deadly Scam
Favorite quote: ” Dr. Harper made her surprising confession at the 4th International Conference on Vaccination which took place in Reston, Virginia. Her speech, which was originally intended to promote the benefits of the vaccines, took a 180-degree turn when she chose instead to clean her conscience about the deadly vaccines so she “could sleep at night”.
Note: Knowledge is power.

From Book Riot: 8 Authors Whose Biggest Successes Came After the Age of 50
Favorite quote: All of it! How refreshing! People not in their 20’s actually have fresh ideas and can actually write books! Who knew?

From BuzzFeed: The Books Who Made Me Who I Am
Tagline: I am the product of endless books.
Favorite quote: “I read this book so often the spine is now white and softened, the pages yellowed with age and the ministrations of my tear-stained fingers.”
Note: Yes, another Roxane Gay essay. I might have to rename this feature “Hot Reads Including Roxane Gay”. But, seriously, this is really good about the FaceBook meme that’s been going around lately. You’ve done it, haven’t you?
*My list below!

50Book list of the week is via Flavorwire: 50 Romantic Novels for People Who Hate Romance Novels because, yes, sometimes you just want to read a love story that’s not all 19th century scoundrels ripping bodices filled with heaving breasts.

Speaking of romance, what about the quiet romance of a long-term relationship? Read our poem of the week, “Starfish” by Eleanor Lerman, on Poets.org. This is a poem I printed out and pasted in my journal a couple of years ago. I read it often. My favorite part below:

Later, you wake up beside your old love, the one
who never had any conditions, the one who waited
you out. This is life’s way of letting you know that
you are lucky.

Lucky. Yes.
_____________________________________

Have a great reading week and don’t forget to follow our Hot Reads board on Pinterest for new reads every week.

 

*Grimm’s Fairy Tales
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood
The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
A Working a Girl Can’t Win by Deborah Garrison
Blindness by Jose Saramago

 

Hot Reads 9/7/14

Women, women, women. In retrospect it seems that last week my reading was all about women and all the myriad ways they think, feel and engage in this world. I think I have a really great line-up of articles to share. Enjoy!

Photo via The Guardian

Photo via The Guardian

From The Guardian: Mary J Blige interview: ‘The UK is a better place to make music than the States’
Tagline: The soul singer talks about her month in London making an album with the cream of British talent including Disclosure, Naughty Boy and Sam Smith – and why she just had to meet Mitch Winehouse.
Favorite quote: “When I’m singing, I don’t think about anything but what I’m doing. I could look crazy in that moment, it doesn’t matter to me. I’m just trying to get all this stuff out. Because it feels good to get it out. It feels good to sing. It’s like you can fly almost, when you singing that stuff.”

From The Washington Post: Being informed and fashionable is natural for women.
Favorite quote: “Is it so inconceivable that a smart, accomplished woman would have both the latest issue of the Economist and the second season of “The Mindy Project” downloaded on her iPad? Sorry, but modern women see no contradiction there.”

Photo via Goodreads

Photo via Goodreads

 

From The Rumpus: Interview with Maya Angelou by New Orleanian Whitney Mackman
Favorite quote: “I don’t expect negative, and when I find it, I run like hell and holler “fire!”

 

 

 

From Slate: That Screaming Lady
Tagline: Lena Dunham, Jill Soloway, and other funny women on what Joan Rivers meant to them.
Favorite quote: “She ran at comedy full-tilt and punched a hole so big that any girl who wanted to give it a try could walk right through.”

Photo via Slate

Photo via Slate

From The Daily Mail UK: Margaret Atwood on being called offensive and man-hating
Tagline: Almost 30 years after the publication of The Handmaid’s Tale, her work has lost none of its ability to unsettle.

Favorite quote: ‘Social media was supposed to make us all aware of one another’s point of view, but it self-sorts,’ she says.‘People turn off anything they don’t already like and only pay attention to people who agree with them. That can be very polarising.’

 

From The Daily Mail UK: The Secret Torment of Joni Mitchell
Tagline: Unflinching insight into the reclusive 70s icon’s battles with a disease that makes her skin crawl, is haunted by stalkers and the heartache of giving her daughter up for adoption.
Favorite quote: “I’d come through such a rough, tormented period as a destitute, unwed mother. It was like you killed somebody. I had some serious battles for a twenty-one-year-old.”

From Brain Pickings: Famous Writers on the Creative Benefits of Keeping a Diary
Tagline: Reflections on the value of recording our inner lives from Woolf, Thoreau, Sontag, Emerson, Nin, Plath, and more.
Favorite quote: “We are creatures of remarkable moodiness and mental turbulence, and what we think we believe at any given moment — those capital-T Truths we arrive at about ourselves and the world — can be profoundly different from our beliefs a decade, a year, and sometimes even a day later.”

From Luna Luna Magazine: Gossip as a Mean of Bonding
Favorite quote: “It’s a shame that humans bond so effectively over gossip that can destroy someone so easily.”

wall

Book List: Unbeknownst to me, August was Women in Translation 66016-witmonth3252btext1Month which was created to  “Increase the dialogue and discussion about women writers in translation”. Our list this week is via Maclehose Press   and features such countries as Portugal, Italy, Germany, and Mozambique in its list of books by women. We have some catching up to do! Next year we’ll be ready.

 

And our poem of the week is by Laurel Blossom. Big thanks to Laurel for granting permission to post her poem, Radio. I’m dedicating this poem to my dear friend, Harriet, whose car was stolen a few days ago.

Radio

No radio
in car

No radio on board

No radio
Already stolen

Absolutely no radio!

Radio broken
Alarm is set
To go off

No radio
No money

No radio
No valuables

No radio or
valuables
in car or trunk

No radio
Stolen 3X

No radio
Empty trunk
Empty glove compartment
Honest

In car
Nothing of value

No radio
No nuthin
(No kidding)

Radio Broken
Nothing Left!

Radio Gone
Note Hole in Dashboard

Warning!
Radio Will Not Play
When Removed
Security Code Required

Would you keep
Anything valuable
On this wreck?

No valuables
In this van

Please do not
Break in
Unnecessarily

Thank you
For your kind
Consideration

Nothing of value
in car
No radio
No tapes
No telephone

_______________________

Don’t forget to check out our Pinterest board during the week for more Hot Reads and have a great reading week!

Hot Reads 8/24/14

It’s a hot, humid Sunday so sit back and take a look at what we read this week while you sip your beverage of choice. All this and more can be found on our Hot Reads From NOLAFemmes.com Pinterest board.
Have a great reading week, y’all!

Onaja Waki (left) is about to start college in California, but she and her mother, Oneida Cordova, have been talking openly for years about the dangers of sexual assault.  Photo credit: Teresa Chin

Onaja Waki (left) is about to start college in California, but she and her mother, Oneida Cordova, have been talking openly for years about the dangers of sexual assault.
Photo credit: Teresa Chin

From NPR: “As Kids Head To Campus, Parents Broach The Subject Of Sexual Assault”
Favorite Quote: “And he may hear all kinds of justifications while at school, she tells him. “I think what concerns me the most is not falling into that group mentality,” she says, “Like, ‘Oh, she’s a slut,’ or, ‘She came wearing a short skirt,’ or, ‘[She] already had sex with one of the guys, therefore it’s OK if everybody does.'”
Least favorite quote: “”That’s one thing I might be relying more on the college orientation helping them through, and giving them some guidelines and things to look out for,” says Gail.”
Note: It’s called sticking your head in the sand syndrome.

From Bloomberg: Hook-Up Culture at Harvard, Stanford Wanes Amid Assault Alarm
Favorite quote: ““This is the only crime where people blame the victim,” said Annie E. Clark, co-founder of End Rape on Campus, based in Los Angeles. “Regardless of what you do, you don’t ask for a crime to be committed.” “

From the U.K.’s Mirror: Crack unit of female soldiers hunting Islamic State kidnappers.
Tagline: Heavily armed women from the Turkish PKK have gone into Iraq to tackle the jihadists.
Favorite quote: ““Our support is just as important for the peshmerga as these US strikes – bombings alone cannot get rid of guerrilla groups,” said Sedar Botan, a female PKK veteran commander.”

And, on a lighter note, from Slate: Musical nostalgia: Why do we love the music we heard as teenagers?
Favorite quote: “The period between 12 and 22, in other words, is the time when you become you. It makes sense, then, that the memories that contribute to this process become uncommonly important throughout the rest of your life. They didn’t just contribute to the development of your self-image; they became part of your self-image—an integral part of your sense of self.”

Book list of the week: Awkward Paper Cut 2014 summer book list – “Summer is synonymous with reading. Wherever you may find yourself, the books below will take you to new places, teach you new things, nudge you to see the world in a different way. Brief, but well-culled, a mix of new work and work that we believe should find a larger audience.”

And our poem for the week is by Luci Tapahonso, This is How They Were Placed for Us.
Note: The audio of this is beautifully read by the poet.

Photo Credit: One.org

Photo Credit: One.org